NEC References

Splice Kits

Article 110.14 (B): Splices. Conductors shall be spliced or joined with splicing devices identified for the use or by brazing, welding or soldering with a fusible metal or alloy. Soldered splices shall first be spliced or joined so as to be mechanically and electrically secure without solder and then be soldered.

All splices and joints as the free ends of conductors shall be covered with an insulation equivalent to that of the conductors or with an insulating device identified for the purpose. Wiring connectors or splicing means installed on conductors for direct burial shall be listed for such use.

Power/Appliance Cords

Article 422.16: Flexible Cords. (A) General. Flexible cord shall be permitted (1) for the connection of appliances to facilitate heir frequent interchange or to prevent the transmission of noise or vibration or (2) to facilitate the removal or disconnection of appliances that are fastened in place, where the fastening means and mechanical connections are specifically designed to permit ready removal for maintenance or repair and the appliance is intended or identified for flexible cord connection.

(B) Specific Appliances. 
(1) Electrically operated Kitchen Waste Disposers. Electrically operated kitchen waster disposers shall be permitted to be cord-and-plug connected with a flexible cord identified for the purpose in the installation instructions of the appliance manufacturer, where all of the following conditions are met:

      (1) The flexible cord shall be terminated with a grounding type attachment plug.

 

    (2) The length of the cord shall not be less than 450mm (18 inches) and is not over 900mm (36 inches).

(2) Built-in Dishwashers and Trash Compactors. Built-in dishwashers an trash compactors shall be permitted to be cord-and-plug connected with a flexible cord identified for the purpose in the installation instructions of the appliance manufacturer, where all of the following conditions are met:

      (1) The flexible cord shall be terminated with a grounding type attachment plug.

 

    (2) The length of the cord shall not be 0.9m to 1.2m (3-Feet to 4-Feet) measured from the face of the attachment plug to the rear plane of the appliance.

(B) Other Heating Appliances. All other cord-and-plug-connected electrically heated appliances shall be connected with one of the approved types of cord listed in Table 400.4, selected in accordance with the usage specified in the table.

Range and Dryer Cords

Article 422.33: Disconnection of Cord-and-Plug Connected Appliances. Cords.
(A) Separable Connector or an Attachment Plug and Receptacle. For cord-and plug connected appliances, an accessible separable connector or an accessible plug and receptacle shall be permitted to serve as the disconnecting means. When the separable connector or plug and receptacle are not accessible, cord-and-plug connected appliances shall be provided with disconnecting means in accordance with 422.31.

(B) Connection at the Rear Base of a Range. For cord-and-plug connected household electric ranges, an attachment plug and receptacle connection at the rear base of a range, if it is accessible from the front by removal of a drawer, shall be considered as meeting the intent of 422.33 (A).

Landscape Lighting

Article 314.15 (A): Damp, Wet or Hazardous (Classified) Locations

Damp or Wet Locations. In damp or wet locations, boxes, conduit bodies and fittings shall be placed or equipped within the box, conduit body or fitting. Boxes, conduit bodies and fittings installed in wet locations shall be listed for use in wet locations.

    FPN No. 1: For boxes in floors, see 314.27 (C).
    FPN No. 2: For protection against corrosion, see 300.6.

Article 100 defines the term weatherproof as “constructed or protected so that exposure to the weather will not interfere with successful operation.” Rainproof, rain tight or watertight equipment can fulfill the requirements for this definition where varying weather conditions other than wetness, such as snow, ice, dust or temperature extremes, are not a factor. A weather head fitting is considered to be weatherproof because the openings for the conductors are placed in a downward position so that rain or snow cannot enter the fitting.

See the definitions of damp location and wet location under location in Article 100, as well as the commentary following the definition of enclosure, for further explanation.

Article 314.16 (A): Number of Conductors in Outlet, Device, and Junction Boxes, and Conduit Bodies.
Boxes and conduit bodies shall be of sufficient size to provide free space for all enclosed conductors. In no case shall the volume of the box, as calculated in 314.16 (A), be less than the fill calculation as calculated in 314.16 (B). The minimum volume for conduit bodies shall be as calculated in 314.16 (C).

The provisions of this section shall not apply to terminal housings supplied with motors.

    FPN: For volume requirements of motor terminal housings, see 430.12.

Boxes and conduit bodies enclosing conductors 4 AWG or larger shall also comply with the provisions of 314.28.

(A) Box Volume Calculations The volume of a wiring enclosure (box) shall be the total volume of the assembled sections and, where used, the space provided by plaster rings, domed covers, extension rings, and so forth, that are marked with their volume or are made from boxes the dimensions of which are listed in Table 314.16 (A).

(1) Standard Boxes The volumes of standard boxes that are not marked with their volume shall be as given in Table 314.16 (A).

(2) Other Boxes Boxes 1650 cm3 (100 in.3) or less, other than those described in Table 314.16 (A), and nonmetallic boxes shall be durably and legibly marked by the manufacturer with their volume. Boxes described in Table 314.16 (A) that have a volume larger than is designated in the table shall be permitted to have their volume marked as required by this section.

Ground Bonding PigTails

EPCO Grounding PigTails NEC References

Article 110 Requirements for Grounding PigTails Electrical Installations

Article 110.14 (A): Terminals. Connection of conductors to terminal parts shall ensure a thoroughly good connection without damaging the conductors and shall be made by means of pressure connectors (including set-screw type), solder lugs, or splices to flexible leads. Connection by means of wire-binding screws or studs and nuts that have upturned lugs or the equivalent shall be permitted for 10 AWG or smaller conductors. Terminals for more than one conductor and terminals used to connect aluminum shall be so identified.

Article 110.14 (B): Splices. Conductors shall be spliced or joined with splicing devices identified for the use or by brazing, welding, or soldering with a fusible metal or alloy. Soldered splices shall first be spliced or joined so as to be mechanically and electrically secure without solder and then be soldered.

All splices and joints as the free ends of conductors shall be covered with an insulation equivalent to that of the conductors or with an insulating device identified for the purpose. Wiring connectors or splicing means installed on conductors for direct burial shall be listed for such use.

Article 250.8: Connection of Grounding and Bonding Equipment
Grounding conductors and bonding jumpers shall be connected by exothermic welding, listed pressure connectors, listed clamps, or other listed means. Connection devices or fittings that depend solely on solder shall not be used. Sheet metal screws shall not be used to connect grounding conductors or connection devices to enclosures.

Section 250.8 prohibits the use of sheet metal screws as a means of directly attaching equipment grounding conductors to equipment or as a means for attaching connection devices for equipment grounding conductors to equipment. Connection means that are listed, that are part of listed equipment, or that are exothermically welded are required to ensure a permanent and low-resistance connection. Exhibit 250.2 and Exhibit 250.3 illustrate two methods of attaching an equipment bonding jumper to a grounded metal box.

Exhibit 250.2 Use of a grounding screw to attach equipment bonding jumper to a metal box.

Exhibit 250.3 Use of listed grounding clip to attach a grounding conductor to a metal box.

Fixture Whips

Article 348.6: Listing Requirements.
FMC and associated fittings shall be listed.

Article 348.20 (A): Size.
Minimum FMC less than metric designator 16 (trade size 1/2”) shall not be used unless permitted in 348.20 (A) (1) through 5 for the metric designator 12 (trade size 3/8”). (1) For enclosing the leads of motors as permitted in Article 430.145 (B). (2) In lengths not in excess of 1.8m (6 ft.) for any of the following uses:

  1. For utilization equipment.
  2. As part of a listed assembly.
  3. For Tap Connections to luminaries (lighting fixtures) as permitted in NEC Article 410.77.

 

Article 348.22: Number of Conductors.
The number of conductors shall not exceed that permitted by the percentage fill specified in Table 1, Chapter 9, or as permitted in Table 348.22 for the metric designator 12 (trade size 3/8”).

Article 410.137 (C): Equipment Not Integral with Luminaire (Fixture)
Wired Luminaire (Fixture) Sections. Wired luminaire (fixture) sections are paired, with a ballast(s) supplying a lamp or lamps in both. For interconnection between paired units, it shall be permissible to use metric designator 12 (trade size 3/8”) flexible metal conduit in lengths not exceeding 7.5 m (25 ft), in conformance with Article 348. Luminaire (fixture) wire operating at line voltage, supplying only the ballast(s) of one of the paired luminaires (fixtures), shall be permitted in the same raceway as the lamp supply wires of the paired luminaires (fixtures).

Wired luminaire sections are shipped in pairs and marked for use in pairs. Each individual unit includes lamps in odd-numbered quantities (one or three is most common), with the odd lamp in each luminaire supplied by a two-lamp ballast located in one luminaire of the pair. Two-lamp ballasts are more energy efficient than single-lamp or three-lamp ballasts.

Article 250.148: Continuity and Attachment of Equipment Grounding Conductors to Boxes
Where circuit conductors are spliced within a box, or terminated on equipment within, or supported by a box, any separate equipment grounding conductors associated with those circuit conductors shall be spliced or joined within the box or to the box, with devices suitable for the use. Connections depending solely on solder shall not be used. Splices shall be made in accordance with 110.14 (B), except that insulation shall not be required. The arrangement of grounding connections shall be such that the disconnection or the removal of a receptacle, luminaire (fixture) or other device fed from the box will not interfere with or interrupt the grounding continuity.”

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